Spotlight

THE WHITE HOUSE
Office of the Press Secretary
January 28, 2014

Remarks of President Barack Obama – As Prepared for Delivery
State of the Union Address
Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Washington, D.C.

Congress passed a bill that will fund the federal government through the end of FY14 (September 30, 2014). This agreement provides some relief to our nation's federally funded science agencies, but the Coalition for the...

Coping with Drug Resistance in Cancer Therapy - 4/9/08

Dr. Charles Sawyers
Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

Dr. Sawyers discusses his research on acquired resistance to cancer treatments. Acquired resistance occurs when the disease relapses, during treatment, after an initial positive response to the treatment. His research focused on patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) who relapsed on the drug Gleevec. He found that those who relapse on Gleevec usually have a mutation or amplification of the BCR-ABL gene that prevents Gleevec from functioning properly.

Dr. Sawyers and others in the field discovered that inhibitors with different binding characteristics might be effective in treating CML despite Gleevec-resistant BCR-ABLE mutations. Dr. Sawyers' research contributed to the development of a new treatment option: Sprycel (dasatinib). Dasatinib was approved for Gleevec-resistant CML patients just five years after the approval of Gleevec! Dasatinib was shown to be effective against all but one of the commonly occurring BCR-ABL mutations.

Dr. Sawyers shares his vision of the not-too-distant future, when physicians will be able to offer patients a pill containing a cocktail of BCR-ABL inhibitors effective against all common mutations of the enzyme; this will dramatically reduce the likelihood of drug resistance for CML patients, and, as research suggests, could even benefit patients suffering from lung and prostate cancers.